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Our Top Books About Grandparents

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Day Break is the story of a family making their way back to Country on January 26. We see the strength they draw from being together, and from sharing stories as they move through a shifting landscape.

The story refocuses the narratives around ‘Australia Day’ on Indigenous survival and resistance, and in doing so honours the past while looking to the future. Confronting yet truthful, painful yet full of hope, Day Break is a crucial story that will open up a conversation on truth-telling for the next generation.


Breanna wrote this story when she was 8 years old and wanted to fly.

Beautifully told and illustrated story of Breanna, who wants to be a superhero. She asks family and friends if she can become a superhero by wishing upon a shooting star. She tries but it doesn't work. Breanna is finally happy with the idea of working hard and becoming a superhero doctor, lawyer, engineer or vet. But she still wants to fly!




Family is a thoughtful contemplation for all to learn the different ways that family makes us whole. This beautifully illustrated children’s picture book shows everyone that ‘family’ can be about heart and home; an endless sky; stories and songs. It ‘learns’ us how to be with each other and with Country. Families come in all shapes and sizes, and this remarkably simple story teaches us all, that family can be many things.

Shortlisted, 2021 Australian Book Industry Awards, small publishers' children’s book of the year


Baby Business tells the story of the baby smoking ceremony that welcomes baby to country. The smoke is a blessing — it will protect the baby and remind them that they belong.

This beautiful ritual is recounted in a way young children will completely relate to.




Collecting Colour - Kylie Dunstan

Collecting Colour was inspired by author and illustrator Kylie Dunstan's time spent as an Arts Officer at a community centre in Arnhem Land, Northern Territory.

One of her duties was to take the local women out on bush trips to collect pandanus and colour for weaving and dyeing the mats and baskets sold in the Arts Centre.

Kylie was born in Broken Hill, New South Wales in 1972, and completed secondary and tertiary (Bachelor of Visual Arts) schooling in Adelaide. She worked for a number of years in commercial art galleries before her twelve-month stint in Gunbalanya (Oenpelli), Arnhem Land. Following this, she travelled overseas before returning to Australia and settling in Melbourne where she worked for Museums Australia.

In 2004 Kylie received an ASA mentorship and worked with author and illustrator Sally Rippin on the development of Collecting Colour. She relocated to Adelaide with her partner and two young children in 2005.


Staircase to the Moon - Bronwyn Houston

The adventure of a girl and her grandfather who sneak out at night to climb the staircase to the moon. They brave bloodthirsty mosquitoes, dive-bombing bats, giant boab trees and sinking mangrove mud before making it to the foot of the staircase. They climb the steps and leap like acrobats on the moon’s surface. Based on a natural phenomenon occurring in Broome in Australia’s north west. As the full moon rises, it reflects across the mudflats creating the illusion of a staircase.

A good book to use when the children are interested in space to embed an Aboriginal perspective.




Fair Skin Black Fella - Renee Fogorty

This book showcases the diversity of Aboriginal people and their appearance.

The story of Mary, a young girl who lives on a dusty cattle station. When she is shunned by the other girls because of her fair skin, Old Ned, one of the community elders, speaks up for her. With words of wisdom, he teaches the girl that Aboriginal identity transcends skin colour and that family, community, country, and culture is what being Aboriginal is really about.


I Remember - Joanne Crawford

I remember is an exquisite tale of memory. Set in the Geraldton area of Western Australia, an elderly woman remembers the camping trips of her childhood.

This book touches on issues of displacement and past injustices gently. This book is appropriate for pre-schoolers.




Stories for Simon - Lauren Briggs

A beautiful story of acknowledging the past and working together for a brighter future.
When Simon unwraps a beautiful boomerang wrapped in an old newspaper, he learns of the national apology to the Stolen Generations. Who were the Stolen Generations and how can saying ‘sorry’ help? Through a new friendship and a magnificent collection of stories, Simon gains a deep appreciation of the past and a positive vision for the future.


On The Way To Nana's - Frances and Lindsay Haji-Ali

Frances and Lindsay Haji-Ali take us counting backwards from FIFTEEN to ONE on this spectacular journey in the far north of WA.

When Frances and Lindsay lived with their family in Broome, they often set out to visit Nana in the tiny outback town of Wyndham over 1,000 km north.

These road trips took them across the magnificent Kimberley landscape and inspired this counting story.

From bulbous boabs and wild brumbies to weary travellers, flying magpie geese and flowing waterfalls, David Hardy’s striking illustrations capture the awe and excitement of this special family adventure.




Main Abija My Grandad - Karen Rogers

A tribute to a much-loved grandfather, celebrating First Nations Australian culture, country and the circle of life. Told in Kriol and English.

'Dijan buk gada ola memri ai bin abum gada main abija from wen ai bin lilgel til imin libu wi. Imin titjim mi loda tings bla koltja en bla kantri. Mi hepi ba pasim det stori la main femili en bla pudum la dis buk.'

'This book has the memories I had of my grandfather from when I was small until he left us. He taught me many things about culture and country. I'm happy to pass this story on to my family and to put it in this book.'

With luscious artwork and a lyrical text in Kriol and English, celebrated Ngukurr artist Karen Rogers evokes the world of her childhood in a remote part of the Northern Territory. Her story is a beautiful celebration of a special relationship, showing how culture is passed on from generation to generation.

'My grandfather touched my heart. I hope everybody can have a chance to love one grandparent that way.'

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