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Top Books for International Womens Day

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An exemplar of Indigenous Studies writing, epistemologically, theoretically and methodologically

A collection of writings on women and Aboriginal identity from 14 senior Indigenous academics and community leaders. The collection engages with questions such as: What makes Aboriginal women strong? Why are grandmothers so important (even ones never met)? How is the connection to country different for Aboriginal people compared to non-Aboriginal people's love of nature or sense of belonging to an area? What is Aboriginal spirituality?

These writings are generous, inclusive and considerate of the non-Aboriginal reader's feelings. They are hopeful for the future, with an emphasis on acknowledging, joining with, collaborating and caring.


Childhood stories of family, country and belonging.

What is it like to grow up Aboriginal in Australia?

This anthology, compiled by award-winning author Anita Heiss, showcases many diverse voices, experiences and stories in order to answer that question.

This book is a great reflective reading for early childhood educators.


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and society has existed on this continent for millennia. It's a culture that manifests itself as the ultimate example of resilience, strength and beauty. It’s also a culture that has consistently been led by its women.


A Tiwi-Island girl prepares for Aunty's wedding with help from her maningawu in this vibrant picture book by the popular actor and writers of Top End Wedding and the highly acclaimed illustrator of Alfred's War.

Everyone on the island is getting ready for Aunty's wedding. Maningawu puts on her best hat and I can wear a wurrijinga in my hair. Lucky! We all dress up, but I still don't understand. Why do people have a wedding?


Collecting Colour was inspired by author and illustrator Kylie Dunstan's time spent as an Arts Officer at a community centre in Arnhem Land, Northern Territory.

One of her duties was to take the local women out on bush trips to collect pandanus and colour for weaving and dyeing the mats and baskets sold in the Arts Centre.


The children Kutabah, Warabal and Bidu travel from their home to the lush rainforests of the Queensland Tablelands. This is their Nana’s land—the abundant rainforest—so far known only to them through her colourful stories. The Elders test Kutabah and Warabal as they travel with their younger brother, Bidu, and begin their transition into the adult world.

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