My Cart

Close

Reconciliation – More than a word

Posted on

This years Reconciliation Week Theme is “More Than A Word” for me this is a call to action that prompts us to reflect on how we are showing up and teaching about Reconciliation EVERY DAY! Here are our top resources that we recommend educators use to explore this years theme further with children.


’When we all came together at Uluru, we invited all Australian people to accept our voice and culture as a gift.’

Can you help us find the heart of the nation?

A book about understanding Australia’s past, so we can have a shared future.



By Coral Vass and Dub Leffler

There was a hum of excitement. Flags flickered in the breeze as Maggie’s heart danced with delight. ‘This is a very special day!’ her mother said.

Maggie holds tight to her mother as they await the long-anticipated apology to show a willingness to reconcile the past for future generations. In the excitement of the crowd, Maggie loses touch of her mother’s hand and is lost.

In a time ‘long ago and not so long ago’ children were taken from their parents, their ‘sorrow echoing across the land’. As the Prime Minister’s speech unfolds Maggie is reunited with her mother. But the faces and memories of the stolen generation are all around them. Two stories entwine in this captivating retelling of the momentous day when the then Prime Minister of Australia, Kevin Rudd, acknowledged the sorrows of past and said ‘Sorry’ to the generation of children who were taken from their homes.


A beautiful story of acknowledging the past and working together for a brighter future.
When Simon unwraps a beautiful boomerang wrapped in an old newspaper, he learns of the national apology to the Stolen Generations. Who were the Stolen Generations and how can saying ‘sorry’ help? Through a new friendship and a magnificent collection of stories, Simon gains a deep appreciation of the past and a positive vision for the future.



The true story of a young girl's search for identity and desire to understand her Aboriginality. Seven-year-old Sarah goes to her great-grandmother and asks questions about her family. This universal feel-good story looks at how family history shapes our childhood journeys



Once there were two little girls who were best friends. They did everything together. As they get older, they weren't allowed to do the same things anymore. Because they looked different. Because of the law.

This is a story about the landmark 1967 Referendum, the two women who came together to change the law... and how the Australia people said YES.


Hello You!

Join our mailing list